Advertisement

Vitamins for senior dogs

Senior dogs have different nutritional requirements due to the changes in their metabolism and energy levels.

In 8 Best Senior Dog Vitamins and Supplements (2020), Kayla of Canine Weekly said that it is important to switch to high-quality senior dog food to ensure the diet meets the needs of your senior dog.

Vitamins for senior dogs
Senior rescued dog Diamond of Save ALL is now 14 years old but she is still active and looks young. She eats dry dog food for senior dogs with a little water to make the kibble soft in the morning, a mixture of dry senior dog food and boiled vegetables and a little meat at lunch time, and vegetables with a little meat in the evening.  We do not give rice to senior dogs. The amount of food is not too much to make sure her stomach will not be overworked. To ensure she gets all the vitamins, minerals and nutrients she needs, she is given 5 ml of a multivitamin that was recommended by the vet. She is also given COQ-10 30 mg for the heart.
Consult your vet before giving supplements or switching to a new diet.

If you feed your dog natural or home made dog food, your dog may need supplements to make sure the dog is getting all the vitamins, minerals and nutrients that he/she needs to stay healthy and happy.

Supplements are also important for dogs who are picky and do not eat enough.

“Supplements are not a foolproof escape from a poor diet, however, and you should consult a vet if your dog is unable, or refuses, to eat a healthy diet,” Kayla said.

Supplements are also recommended when your dog has been diagnosed with a vitamin or mineral deficiency, or a medical condition that responds well to supplements.

“Although most healthy dogs do not need supplements,  the extra vitamins and nutrients they supply can help ease the symptoms of a variety of conditions in older dogs,” Kayla said.

Kayla said there are supplements recommended by a vet for some cases. These are:

1. Supplements to ease hip and joint pain and stiffness.

“When searching for a hip and joint supplement, look for one that contains glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, as well as essential fatty acids. These nutrients work together to reduce inflammation and improve joint mobility.” Kayla said.

2. Essential fatty acids, such as omega-3 and omega-6, help improve a dog’s skin and coat and help brain function, which can slow down as a dog gets older.

3. Probiotics to help digestion, especially if the good bacteria in your elderly dog’s stomach has been killed off by illness or medication.

Be sure to ask your vet if any of these supplements are needed.

 “Always remember that supplements for older dogs can alleviate some symptoms of illness and aging, but they are not a prevention or a cure,” Kayla stressed.

Kayla cited as an example a  dog with arthritis who will need medication “backed by a full clinical trial, rather than just hip and joint supplements.”

Risks of  giving supplements

Do watch out for potential risks because “supplements have not gone through rigorous clinical testing are unregulated,” said Kayla.

“This lack of regulation can result in supplements with ingredients that are not proven to be effective, or even safe, as well as discrepancies between labels and actual ingredients,” Kayla added.

 “Although an excess of some vitamins, such as water-soluble vitamin C, is harmless (your dog will just pee out the excess), other vitamins, such as fat-soluble vitamins A and D, can build up in your pet’s body, potentially to harmful levels,” Kayla stressed.

“Even organic or all-natural supplements have potential risks attached. Certain supplements can interact with medications, which could leave your dog with harmful consequences that are difficult to understand, and tricky to trace,” Kayla said.

Your vet will know when to give supplements and what vitamins to give, she said.

Topics: senior dogs , 8 Best Senior Dog Vitamins and Supplements , Canina Daily
COMMENT DISCLAIMER: Reader comments posted on this Web site are not in any way endorsed by Manila Standard. Comments are views by manilastandard.net readers who exercise their right to free expression and they do not necessarily represent or reflect the position or viewpoint of manilastandard.net. While reserving this publication’s right to delete comments that are deemed offensive, indecent or inconsistent with Manila Standard editorial standards, Manila Standard may not be held liable for any false information posted by readers in this comments section.
AdvertisementKPPI
Advertisement