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A tribute to those who passed on

The 17th Congress is at a close, and in only a few weeks we welcome the 18th Congress with new names and familiar faces. 

The 17th Congress saw significant bills filed, passionately deliberated in vehement readings, until finally becoming milestone laws. It was a combined effort from the working house of representatives. 

But all these achievements cannot go unnoticed without remembering the assiduous individuals who died while serving in the 17th Congress. Although posthumously, let us give tribute as well to those whose contributions to the House will forever be appreciated. These honorable men and women showed all of us the meaning of service beyond the call of duty. 

Henedina Razon-Abad

A tribute to those who passed on

Henedina Razon-Abad, simply called as Dina became the representative of the lone district of Batanes in 2004 to 2007, and won the polls in 2010, 2013, and 2016. Described as someone who is dedicated and devoted to the cause of the Filipino people, Dina is known for being an advocate of rural development and agrarian reform. Unfortunately, at the age of 62, Abad succumbed to cancer on October 8, 2017, leaving her husband, Butch, and her four children: Julia Andrea, Pio Emmanuel, Luis Andres, and Cecilia Paz.

Jum Jainudin Akbar

A tribute to those who passed on

A Basilan native and known to be the first governor of the province, Jum Akbar succeeded her late husband and strongman, Wahab Akbar, who died during the 2007 bombing of Batasang Pambansa. Despite being soft-spoken and cool, Akbar is described to be highly-competent when it comes to hearing and plenary sessions. She is one of the legislators who strongly pushed the passage of Bangsamoro Basic Law. The 53-year-old lawmaker died on November 11, 2016 due to cardiac arrest at St. Lukes Medical Center and is survived by his son, Al-Qauid.

Rodel M. Batocabe

A tribute to those who passed on

The late AKO BICOL Party List Representative Rodel M. Batocabe is one of the most hard working lawmakers of the 17th Congress. He authored and co-authored laws that cover education, health, good governance, and livelihood. He was also the President and head of the Party List Coalition. Under his direction, he stressed the importance of having “one voice” in partylists to be able to recognize in the House. But in an unfateful day, Batocabe, together with his bodyguard was killed three days before Christmas during a gift-giving event in Daraga, Albay.

Ciriaco S. Calalang

A tribute to those who passed on

Kabayan Partylist Representative Cirico Calalang is well-known for his public service during his term as a congressman. As a lawmaker, Calalang was able to author and co-author 47 House measure covering advocacies on juvenile justice, education, senior citizens, criminal justice, public transportation, and land use. At the age of 67, Calalang died of stroke six days after surgery.

Maximo B. Dalog

A tribute to those who passed on

Representative of the lone district of Mountain Province, Maximo Dalag or “The Wise Man,” called by his friends, pushed for the autonomy of the Cordillera region during his term. Before, he was also the chairman of North Luzon Growth Quadrangle of the 17th Congress. In the early morning of Saturday, June 3, 2017, Dalog passed away due to kidney failure.

Tupay Loong

A tribute to those who passed on

Loong was a native of Sulu who turned out to be its representative in the 17th Congress. He was also one of the founders of the group Moro National Liberation Front before quitting in 1974. In the year 2010, Loong urged the rebels and the national government in a speech to “silence their guns” in the name of peace and development for Mindanao. On June 30, 2016, Loong died due to liver cirrhosis in a Manila private hospital.

Topics: 17th Congress , Tribute , House of Representatives , Rodel Batocabe , Tupay Loong , Maximo Dalog , Ciriaco Calala , Henedina Razon-Abad , Jum Jainudin Akbar
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