Advertisement

El Niño: Too big a problem

State of calamity in Cebu; Angat water running low

Cebu province was placed under a state of calamity Monday due to the damage done to crops by the dry spell brought about by the El Niño phenomenon.

El Niño: Too big a problem
SEPULCHRAL SCENE. Sun-burnt patch of land in Cebu, which has been placed by authorities under a state of calamity Monday due to the effect of the weather phenomenon El Niño on all crops, with provincial officials approving a resolution declaring a state of calamity and immediately earmarking P59 million for the relief and assistance of affected farmers and fishermen. Damage to crops and marine resources is being assessed.
The declaration, approved by the Cebu Provincial Board, will allow the use of emergency funds to help farmers affected by the dry spell.

A statement issued by the provincial information office said Argao and Dalaguete towns were priority areas for assistance.

The provincial government has allotted about P60 million as Quick Respond Fund this year to address the effects of the El Niño.

Earlier, the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office recommended a declaration of a state of calamity, based on its province-wide assessment, which showed that 27 local government units reporting damage to crops and fishing.

The weather bureau on Monday said “dry will become drier and wet will become wetter” as a result of global warming.

In an interview, Analiza Solis, chief of the weather bureau’s Climate Information Monitoring and Prediction, said this would mean more powerful, though fewer typhoons.

Before year 2000, an El Niño phenomenon happened every 10 to 15 years, she said.

El Niño: Too big a problem
STRIKINGLY DIFFERENT. A mother and her child (above) enjoy swimming in the murky waters at Baseco Beach to beat the summer heat—32 degrees Celsius on Monday with humidity at 64 percent—against the warning of the Department of Environment to avoid getting sick while residents of Barangay Addition Hills in Mandaluyong City (below) queue up behind a water ration tank for water. Ey Acasio
“Now, it has shortened to five to 10 years,” she added.

“In 1982, 1983, 1987 and 1998, there were strong El Niño episodes,” Solis said. Other strong episodes occurred in 2010, 2015 and 2016, “or every five to 10 years.”

The more extreme weather conditions would become the “new normal,” she said.

Meanwhile, the weather bureau’s hydrologist, Sheila Schneider, said Bulacan’s Angat Dam, which supplies 97 percent of Metro Manila’s safe and potable water, is “getting lower and lower everyday.”

“Last Sunday, water level dipped by .37 meters,” she told the Manila Standard.

Business groups on Monday signified support to government efforts to solve water disruption in the east zone of Metro Manila within 150 days.

The groups led by the Management Association of the Philippines said they were confident that the interim measures will resolve the shortage to bring immediate relief to consumers.

El Niño: Too big a problem
STRIKINGLY DIFFERENT. A mother and her child enjoy swimming in the murky waters at Baseco Beach to beat the summer heat—32 degrees Celsius on Monday with humidity at 64 percent—against the warning of the Department of Environment to avoid getting sick while residents of Barangay Addition Hills in Mandaluyong City queue up behind a water ration tank for water. Norman Cruz
“We are heartened by the fact that measures have been developed in consultation with and cooperation of all stakeholders, including government water agencies, regulators and the two private concessionaires,” the groups said. With PNA

READ: Heat is on, it’s dry season

READ: Angat water level fast going down, PAGASA warns​

Topics: state of calamity , Cebu , El Niño phenomenon , Cebu Provincial Board , Quick Respond Fund
COMMENT DISCLAIMER: Reader comments posted on this Web site are not in any way endorsed by Manila Standard. Comments are views by manilastandard.net readers who exercise their right to free expression and they do not necessarily represent or reflect the position or viewpoint of manilastandard.net. While reserving this publication’s right to delete comments that are deemed offensive, indecent or inconsistent with Manila Standard editorial standards, Manila Standard may not be held liable for any false information posted by readers in this comments section.
AdvertisementGMA-Working Pillars of the House
Advertisement