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US Supreme Court to hear key immigration cases after election

The US Supreme Court agreed on Monday to take up two key cases related to President Donald Trump's immigration policies after the November election.

US Supreme Court to hear key immigration cases after election
In this file photo the US Supreme Court Building is seen on Decmeber 24, 2018 in Washington DC. The US Supreme Court agreed on October 19, 2020 to take up two key cases related to President Donald Trump's immigration policies after the November election. The cases involve a challenge to the diversion of military funds to build the US-Mexico border wall and a policy which requires asylum seekers to remain in Mexico while their claims are being processed. AFP
The cases involve a challenge to the diversion of military funds to build the US-Mexico border wall and a policy which requires asylum seekers to remain in Mexico while their claims are being processed.

Building a wall along the US-Mexico border was one of Trump's signature campaign promises in 2016.

After Congress denied him funding, the president declared a "national emergency" and dipped into Pentagon funds to build a portion of the barrier.

A US Court of Appeals ruled that the use of the military funds -- most of which have already been spent -- was unlawful and the Trump administration appealed to the Supreme Court.

In the other case, the Supreme Court will hear a challenge to the "remain in Mexico" policy under which tens of thousands of asylum seekers have been returned to Mexico while their claims are being examined.

An appeals court ordered an end to the practice but the Supreme Court gave it a temporary green light until it hears the case.

Decisions in the two cases are expected before the end of June, well after the November 3 election between Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.

Topics: US Supreme Court , Donald Trump , November election , US-Mexico border
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