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An urban agriculture revolution at home

There’s a new kind of security policemen are beginning to uphold. It is food security, one that identifies the home or at their camps where people can grow their own food in tiered racks and tight spaces.

An urban agriculture revolution at home
Other than giving passersby a delightful, albeit tempting, sight, this patch of green and rainbow-colored vegetables, including lettuce and red pepper, proves that right in the urban jungle, one can convert an empty lot into a useful piece of edible paradise. Nothing could be more useful than this vegetable patch.
The brainchild of the Police Security and Protection Group (PSPG) advisory council, chaired by Dr. Reghis Romero II (RII), the sustainable agriculture project complements Quezon City Mayor Joy Belmonte’s “Joy of Urban Farming” (JFP) program and aims to contribute to the nation’s effort to achieve food security and alleviate mass poverty. It also reflects RII’s active leadership in preserving the environment.

The project provides a nutritious and safe supply of agricultural products and increases the value of agricultural production in urban and peri-urban areas by utilizing environmentally sustainable solutions that respond to current demand for food.

An urban agriculture revolution at home
From left: Dr. Alicia Denaya, a member of the PNP-PSPG Advisory Council, who initiated Joy In Urban Farming in PSPG, and council chairman Dr. Reghis M. Romero II. The PSPG, in its unwavering commitment to the environment, is the first of its kind to have ever supported the government's thrust to make the country food-secure.
PSPG is comprised of more than 2,000 personnel, which potentially translates to over 2,000 urban farms that can be developed in their homes, which translates to savings and potential income source for their families.

This is aside from the 21 PSPG facilities in Malacanang grounds: Camp Crame, Batasang Pambansa, Intramuros and other satellite offices in the Philippines. The Department of Environment and Natural Resources and the Quezon City Mayor’s Office provide the lectures and the seedlings of green leafy vegetables, which have shallow roots and can be planted in recycled containers.

In two months, members of the PSPG have generated tomato, okra, squash, eggplant, kangkong, peppers, bitter gourd, string beans in their backyards.

An urban agriculture revolution at home
With a family that relishes dishes flavored by herbs and spices, Major Ace Salvacion of PNP PSPG  grins contentedly, even with a tinge of pride and self-fulfillment, as he poses  in his basil farm which he maintains the hydroponic way, or one without a need for soil and planted in any available vessel.
With the full support of RII’s PSPG Advisory Council, the PSPG shall achieve the JFP objectives by 2022. This is in support of the agriculture policies in the Philippines seeking to enhance the level of participation of the small landholders to maintain food security and self-sufficiency. 

 

Topics: food security , Police Security and Protection Group , Reghis Romero II
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