Truth, not its versions

posted January 23, 2021 at 12:40 am
In this era of information surplus and fake news, there is a need to quickly go back to the basics of proper information dissemination to the various publics that subscribe today to all forms of media.

Truth, not its versions

At a time when thousands have climbed up the bandwagon of unlicensed spreaders of information, scattering all kinds of claims not supported by researched reality on the ground, we need to stand up to the challenge of upholding the truth and crushing the lies for people who must continue to believe in the integrity of the disseminators.

This clarion call addressed to everyone who has the go-ahead and support of print, broadcast, and online, among others, is timely, with the nomination of the International Fact-Checking Network at the Florida-based Poynter Institute for this year’s Nobel Peace Prize.

Alarm bells should sound when people spread lies through disinformation. This should be true for whoever makes that claim—from the most naive of social media users to the highest official of the land.

Information must be disseminated in accessible formats, supported by clear and complete facts. Questions must be welcomed and not discouraged or taken personally; they should be answered directly. These facts should be available to all who seek them.

Fact-checking has grown out of necessity and will continue to play a big role in the future. Everyone has to embrace a culture of being conscientious providers and discriminating consumers of information.

Topics: information dissemination , International Fact-Checking Network , Nobel Peace Prize
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