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Martial Law abhorred by most Pinoys

MOST Filipinos disagree with the need to impose Martial Law to address the various problems being faced by the country, the latest Pulse Asia survey released Wednesday revealed.

The survey, conducted among 1,200 adult respondents showed that 74 percent do not see the need to impose Martial Law to resolve the many crises facing the nation, while 12 percent agree with the need to have martial rule. Fourteen percent were undecided.

The sentiment was the prevailing opinion in all geographic areas, with disproval highest in Metro Manila at 81 percent, Balance Luzon at 74 percent, Mindanao at 75 percent and Visayas at 65 percent. 

The opinion was also shared by all socio-economic classes (67 percent to 76 percent), age groupings (70 percent to 77 percent), as well as among both men and women (73 percent and 74 percent, respectively).

Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella assured the public that President Rodrigo Duterte will not impose Martial Law to solve the country’s social ills. 

“The President earlier said that the imposition of martial law does not seem to improve significantly the lives of the Filipinos. He cited the experience during the administration of former President Marcos as the best argument for him not to declare Martial Law,” he said in a statement. 

The survey, conducted from Dec. 6 to 11, 2016, had a margin of error of ± 3% at 95 percent confidence level.

Among the prevailing issues leading to the date when the survey was conducted were the resignation of Vice President Leni Robredo as head of the Housing and Urban Development Coordinating Council and criticisms to the President’s decision allowing the burial of former President Ferdinand E. Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani.

Topics: Martial Law , Pulse Asia survey , Filipinos
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