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One million Samsung smartphones in US recall

The US Consumer Product Safety Commission announced a recall of around one million Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones plagued by incidents of batteries bursting into flames.

The move by the US safety agency formalizes the recall underway in 10 countries after reports of faulty batteries that caused some handsets to explode during charging.

Samsung, meanwhile, announced replacements for the faulty phones would be available to US customers next week.

In the United States, there have been 92 reports of batteries overheating, including 26 reports of burns and 55 reports of property damage, including fires in cars and a garage, the commission said in a notice.

The US notice affects around one million of the global total of 2.5 million handsets being recalled, which has cast a cloud over the South Korean electronics giant and world's largest smartphone vendor.

Samsung has advised consumers in 10 countries to trade their handsets for temporary replacement phones until it releases an updated flagship device.

But many users have snubbed the offer, choosing to wait until the new phones were available, citing the inconvenience of switching devices for an interim period.

And different regulatory practices in different countries -- as well as varying reactions from carriers -- have caused a degree of customer uncertainty and confusion that is hampering Samsung's efforts to get the recall behind it as quickly and painlessly as possible.

In a half-page ad carried by major South Korean newspapers on Wednesday, Samsung announced a Note 7 software update that will limit battery recharges to 60 percent of capacity. It would prevent the phones from overheating and thus exploding, but would effectively mean a downgrade of the high-end device.

Topics: US , South Korea , IT , lifestyle , Samsung , recall
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