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Electronic stickers offered to Cavitex motorists for convenience

Motorists using the Cavite Expressway and even those planning to pass through the 14-kilometer expressway have something to look forward to on their next trip.

The country’s very first radio frequency identification powered battery-less electronic sticker, called “EasyDrive,” is now available in Cavitex, promising three seconds or less toll transaction per vehicle.

EasyDrive uses the latest RFID technology in a paper-thin, sticker form that contains a chip and antenna attached to a vehicle’s windshield. RFID antennas, on the other hand, are installed in “EasyDrive” dedicated toll lanes at north and south bound of Cavitex Parañaque and Kawit toll plazas. The RFID antennas can automatically detect EasyDrive electronic stickers on a vehicle’s windshield and will raise the toll barrier.

“We value people’s time. Be it from the motorist, commuter or business operator’s mindset, value-for-money for each RFID subscription equates to convenience. And that is where EasyDrive comes in—convenience in every aspect of the Cavitex motorists toll experience,” said Eugene Antonio, president and chief executive of Easytrip, the Cavitex supplier of EasyDrive.

With the RFID technology, approximately 1,200 vehicles can pass through Cavitex EasyDrive lanes within three seconds or less, thereby solving queuing in toll lanes.

Aside from supplying the e-pass for Cavitex, Easytrip signed a partnership agreement with Cavitex Infrastructure Corp. to provide marketing and account management services for EasyDrive in the toll road.

EasyDrive is currently available at a promo price of P199, and is reloadable using Easytrip’s loading networks: Smart Money, SM Business Centers, Bayad Centers, United Coconut Planters Bank, Metrobank and also on auto-debit arrangements through Visa and Mastercard and Bancnet-supported ATMs.

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